Timothy Klugh – “Magick and Poison – 5th Movement: Drawing Down The Moon”

Magick & Poison - 5th Movement: Drawing Down The Moon

Timothy Klugh – “Magick and Poison – 5th Movement: Drawing Down The Moon”

Magick & Poison - 5th Movement: Drawing Down The Moon

On first listen to the Ohio composer Timothy Klugh and his track “Magick & Poison – 5th Movement: Drawing Down the Moon,” you really have a hard time deciphering what’s going on. The song starts out somber and slow but evolves into a burning force of sound and power.  I can’t really describe “Magick & Poison” as a single or even a “song” in the standard sense. Instead, I see it as as a perfect backdrop for imagery: an ideal soundtrack or film score to a surrealist scene that we’d have to see in order to believe.

The song commences with a low, rumbling drum build: the kind that could lead into a movie theme at any second. However, the synthesized piano and dong throw this pattern off course and begin an unexpected chord progression. Then, after the jazzy cymbals and medieval harpsichord enter, you’ve given up guessing what’s to come next. It’s no use. This song could go anywhere and have anything. As a listener, your walls are crumbling and you’re just waiting for some spooky voices to chime in and talk directly to you.

Around the 2 minute mark, it all starts to make sense. The song erupts into a meadow of Danny Elfman inspired noise. From the rising orchestra to the descending and twinkling keys, it becomes clear that this is music that definitely belongs in a Tim Burton stop-motion film. After the images of this came to my head, I decided that this is how Timothy Klugh’s compositions are best experienced. I think if Timothy Klugh is hired to create a soundtrack for a film or short, we can expect him to really bring the scenes to life.

Bio:

I am a self-taught composer and pianist and that has given my music its own flavor and style. I spent many years happily and eagerly developing my skills. I would listen to all kinds of music on the radio and analyze what it was that made certain songs so powerful. I collected records and compact discs of my favorite works so I could listen to them as much as I wanted to and discover what those songwriters, composers, musicians and vocalists did that captivated me so much. I practiced my skills to try to make my own music carry the same captivation only with its own flavor… my flavor.

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